ACTION POINT: The point where an instruction, or a part thereof, is carried out. Obviously, some instructions may have more than one action point. An example of a multiple action instruction might be: 17. RIGHT. CAST 30 MPH AT STOP. The first action point is when you turn right. (You have initiated the instruction.) The second action point is when you change the average speed at the STOP. You have then completed, or completely satisfied, the instruction.

ACUTE: A turn of substantially more than 90 degrees at an intersection.

AFTER: Any navigational aid identified by the use of the word after” may be found anywhere along the rallye route following the point of execution of the immediately preceding route instructions.

AHEAD: To go essentially straight ahead. This term will be used only at a point where you would have followed the rallye route otherwise.

APEX: The point midway through a corner.

AT: Any navigational aid identified by the use of the word “at” will be in the immediately proximity of the intended point of execution.

BEAR: A turn of substantially less than 90 degrees at an intersection.

BEFORE: Any navigational aid identified by the use of the word before” must lie visibly ahead of the final opportunity or execution before that aid.

BLINKER: A fixed warning signal consisting of a light, usually red or yellow that flickers or blinks. It must be operating to be considered.

CAST: The abbreviation for Change Average Speed To.

COMPLETE: An instruction is complete (completely satisfied) when all requirements of that instruction are exactly fulfilled.

CROSS: To go straight across. To cross a divided highway is to cross both halves of it.

CROSSROAD: Normally a place where one road crosses another on the same level. However, more than one road may cross another on the same level and still be considered a crossroad. The intersection of two roads makes a “four corners” pattern. The roads may cross at any angle. Note that at least two roads must completely cross each other.

CURVE ARROW: Any curve arrow signs, usually black on yellow that show that the road you are on curves in the direction described. (Curve arrows are also DIRECTIONAL ARROWS.)

DIRECTIONAL ARROW: Any arrow signs, usually black on yellow, showing that the road you are on curves sharply or turns in the direction indicated.

DOUBLE ARROW: A two-headed arrow sign, usually black on yellow. Used primarily to indicate a T intersection when it is in front of you. When it is on either side of you, it will apply to a side road. However, the sign is valid either in front of you or on either side of you.

FREE ZONE: A part of the timed rallye route in which there are no timing controls.

GAIN: To make up a specified time during passage of a specified distance. The gain time is subtracted from the time required at the given average speed to traverse the specified distance. The specified distance in which a gain is operative is a free zone.

INSTRUCTION (i.e. Route Instruction): The only reasons for the existence of a route instruction are: 1. To take off the course you would normally follow in the absence of that instruction. 2. To institute a speed change, timing alteration, or to execute an unmanned control (which at times also serves to take you off of the route you would normally follow in the absence of that instruction).

INTERSECTION: Any meeting or crossing of two or more public roads.

JOG: Where the road you are on changes direction by approximately 90 degrees to the left or to the right for a short distance, and then changes back to its original direction.

LEFT: A turn to left from 1 to 179 degrees. If alone in an instruction it is to be executed at the first opportunity.

LEG: The part of a rallye route extending from one timing control to the next.

MILEAGE OFFICIAL: The distance from the start of a section to a point along the rallye route given to within 0.1 mile.

MAIN ROAD (MR) a.k.a. OBVIOUS ROUTE (OR): The route that you would travel through an intersection when an instruction does not apply at the intersection, that route being described in the general instructions.

ODOMETER CHECK: That portion of the rallye route used to calibrate odometer correction factor. Either a stated time for passage or an average speed is given. The odometer check will usually be a free zone. See FREE ZONE.

ONTO: When General Instructions indicate ONTO as a Main Road determinant, carefully read your General Instructions so as to understand how the ONTO is applied. ONTO is frequently used as a Main Road determinant but usage may vary slightly from one rallye to the next.

OUT MARKER: A small flag or other obvious indicating device that marks an exact official distance from the IN MARKER of the control, the distance usually being 0.10 official miles. The OUT MARKER is used as a reference point for the contestant to adjust his mileage, and a reference point for timing calculations, 0.10 mile from beginning of the new leg (since the marker marks the end of one leg and the beginning of another). Contestants should use only the OUT MARKER for mileage references; they should not be permitted to block entry to the control by using the IN MARKER as a reference.

OUT TIME: The exact time specified for departure from the start, from a control, from a stop or from any point indicated on the course.

OVERPASS: Refers to what the road you are on does in relation to something else. For example, a railroad overpass is where your road goes over some tracks.

PAUSE: To delay a specified time at a named point or during passage of a specified distance. The pause time is added to the time required at the given average speed to traverse the specified distance. The specified distance in which a pause is operative is a free zone.

PAVED: A road having a continuous hard surface, such as concrete, brick, macadam, etc., obviously suited to moderate or heavy duty traffic.

PICK UP: To go essentially straight onto a new road or route.

REDUNDANCY: A route instruction is redundant when the instruction takes the same course through an intersection as you would normally take in the absence of that instruction. In such a situation, the route instruction is redundant and would not apply at that intersection; you would follow the obvious route (or previous instruction, as in the case of a “toward,” etc.,) through the intersection and continue to work on the same instruction. The instruction can be executed only at an intersection where, in the absence of the instruction, you would have followed another route through the intersection. See OBVIOUS ROUTE, INSTRUCTION.

RIGHT: A turn to the right from 1 to 179 degrees.

SATISFY: An instruction is satisfied (completed) when all of the conditions therein are executed.

SECTION: Any part of a rallye route at the beginning of which the official mileage is zero and at the end of which the official mileage ends or reverts back to zero.

SIDE ROAD: Any public road extending only one way from the main road which is being followed – may be from straight to 179 degrees.

SRIP: The abbreviation for Sign Reading IPart. For example, the sign “CENTER CURB AHEAD” might be given as “CENTER CURB” SRIP, or “CURB” SRIP, or “CENTER AHEAD” SRIP, etc.

STOP SIGN: Refers to an official highway stop sign applying to your direction of travel.

STRAIGHT: To go straight ahead. This term shall be used only for clarification to indicate the proper course through an intersection.

T: An intersection having the general shape of the letter T requiring a turn to the left or right, both turns being essentially equal. It is not possible to go straight at a T.

TOWARD: To turn (go) toward a sign, landmark, or direction at the first opportunity. It is necessary to continue turning toward the reference until the next instruction may be executed. If the next instruction could be executed at the same point that another TOWARD could be executed (provided of course that they both take the same course through the point in question) then the next instruction is redundant and TOWARD is executed again.

TRAFFIC CONTROL DEVICE: A signal light used on highways, especially at an intersection, to regulate the movement of traffic. A traffic light may be set to operate as a blinker but is usually fixed, alternating red and green (and frequently including yellow as a transition between red and green) indicating stop and go (and caution). The signal must be operating to be considered.

TRANSIT ZONE: A part of a rallye route in which there are not timing controls and in which no specific speed need be maintained. Either an exact time for passage, or a restart time from the end of the transit zone must be given. An approximate distance for the length of the transit zone is desirable.

TRIANGLE: An intersection of three roads in the general shape of a triangle or inverted delta, including within the intersection a generally untraveled grass, gravel or other surface. It is not possible to go straight at a triangle. Only one instruction may be executed at a triangle. This is the definition whether or not the term triangle” appears in the route instructions.

TURN: To make a change of course or direction at an intersection which would not have been made in the absence of turn instructions.

UNDERPASS: Refers to what the road you are on does in relation to something else. For example, a highway underpass is where your road goes under a highway.

UNPAVED: A road having a discontinuous, non-hard surface such as broken stone, gravel, dirt, etc.

Y: An intersection having the general shape of the letter Y requiring a turn to the left or right, both turns being substantially less than 90 degrees. It is not possible to go straight at a Y.

Y-T: An intersection composed of a T preceded by a triangle. Commonly used for clarification.